News About Multi-Sensory World

Guest Blog- The Benefits of employing an Autistic Person

By Clare Meaney
on July 30, 2016

Here is  Guest Blog from Joe from Incluzy.

In the UK there are more than 700,000 individuals living with autism, however, less than 15% of these people are in full-time employment. This is a dispiriting figure when you consider the many skills and talents people with autism have, skills which are highly beneficial in the workplace.

Autism Spectrum Disorder is not a disease or illness and it cannot be cured - the unique elements of autism are an integral part of the person’s make-up. As it is defined across a spectrum, people with autism will all experience it in a unique way, however, it usually has some effect on how individuals communicate and interact with others. As well, it is also important to remember that autism is not a visible disability.

In 2010, The Equality Act came into force in the UK and made it unlawful for any employer to discriminate on the grounds of disability. Perhaps this has made some employers reassess their approach to autism, however, employing people with a disability is not a matter of filling quotas. Instead, the focus should be on the value each individual can bring to the prospective role. Those who fall within the spectrum of autism have a huge amount to offer companies. Individuals with autism are often excellent problem solvers; have outstanding concentration and memory skills; pay great attention to detail; and are highly dependable, just some of the traits that companies are looking for in employees.

While every applicant who applies for a job should be treated as an individual, there is common ground amongst people with autism that can be reached, which, when recognised by companies can make the hiring process run much more smoothly.

Things to consider:

Communication

Some individuals with autism will find understanding body language and facial expressions difficult and this can sometimes hinder communication.

Repetitive Behaviours

People with autism will often see the world in a different way and thus they tend to enjoy the security of familiarity and routine. This is a positive trait in a working environment.

Interaction

Interaction concerns how individuals with autism behave in the presence of others. For example, if they are concerned, they may retreat within themselves; or they may sometimes appear insensitive, but only because they find it difficult to read cues from those around them.

The Interview Process

People with autism often develop a keen interest in a particular subject and become hugely knowledgeable about it. If you can discover what this interest is during the interview, and encourage the candidate to talk about it, it can help put them at ease. 

Sometimes jokes and sarcasm are not understood well by individuals with autism, as physical cues are hard for them to read. Therefore, be straightforward and express yourself clearly. Also, if there are gaps in the conversation don’t rush in to fill the silence, the person may just need a little longer to formulate their response.

The Induction Process

Once an individual with autism has been hired, there are simple steps you can take to make their first few days with you as positive an experience as possible.

  • Send induction material to the new employee early so they can take the time to read through and absorb it before they start. This will help to lessen first day nerves.
  • If possible, try to seat the person away from noise or people passing by regularly, as this can be unsettling. It’s also important to build structure into the day so individuals know what to expect.
  • People with autism can be perfectionists so it’s important to give regular feedback on how things are going and provide reassurance where necessary.

Individuals with autism tend to have strong skills in particular areas and can often outperform their peers in these capacities. It’s important therefore to tap into these strengths and allow the employee the freedom to utilise their skill-set within the working environment. When this happens much of the misunderstanding about autism falls away and employers recognise what a valuable asset the individual is to their business.

More information can can be found here.

 

A big thank you to Joe and the team at incluzy for there hard work and commitment to heping people with disabilies obtain jobs.

The Manchester Autism Show 2015 - Laughter and Surprise

By Clare Meaney
on June 30, 2015

So it’s been a very busy few weeks for us here at Multi-sensory World getting ready to exhibit at The Manchester Autism show it’s the first time we have done this exhibition so it was a bit nerve wracking trying to work out the amount of stock needed etc. it’s clear to say we completely underestimated how popular we would be and sold out of so many things and had to keep re-stocking with other items. Our chew Jewellery section was very thin after the first day and was empty by the end of the 2 days thankfully our supplier is fantastic and we are all stocked up again now as I know a lot of you were disappointed we had already sold so many.

The amount of times we had people coming back to the stall saying ‘I didn’t see this before’ it was a bit of a rugby scrum at times and our stall however big we have them always seems to be over flowing and a few people were pleading with us to get certain items out of the van which we did :-) Couldn’t say no.

The exhibition was brilliant unfortunately I didn’t manage to listen to even 1 talk as we were just too busy it’s great to give so many children, families and professionals the opportunity to try our products out, our stand was full of laughter and surprise. Laughter of happy children (and adults) trying out the water beads and kaleidoscope lamps surprise from parents watching their children who NEVER sit down sat on our Senseez cushions or with weighted lap pads and not moving off the seat at all. It really is lovely to see a bit of relief on parents faces as they realise that the sensory seeking can be calmed down with these simple tools.

    


A highlight for me was meeting the lovely people at the play doctors there products really are fantastic and it’s great to meet people with far more experience at exhibitions than ourselves to give us some insight.Also explaining to some families about Sensory diets as this has been so successful for us as a family with my little man (we will be following up in another blog on our progress soon) but so many have still never heard about it but we will keep trying to promote awareness.

We couldn’t thank the organisers enough they looked after us so much and the event city staff were also so helpful (even helped us with boxes on set up day) and we were so grateful for all the really positive feedback and compliments we received from the show about our Company, Facebook page and products and its great seeing some familiar faces popping up on our Facebook page.

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