News About Multi-Sensory World

Guest Blog- Lockdown life- By Clare Bailey

By Chloe Jones
on May 26, 2020

Lockdown Life: 5 Autism parenting tips to help you cope

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Guest Blog- Craniosacral Therapy helped reduce my Autistic son's Anxiety by Clare Bailey

By Chris Meaney
on May 26, 2020

Guest Blog- Craniosacral Therapy helped reduce my Autistic son's Anxiety by Clare Bailey

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Guest blog- PDA through a parent’s eyes by Clare Bailey

By Chris Meaney
on May 26, 2020

PDA through a parent’s eyes

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Covid-19- The time the world went crazy

By Chris Meaney
on April 08, 2020

Covid-19 Lockdown

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Need more sleep? Then this is the product for you.

By Clare Meaney
on January 26, 2018

Need more sleep? Fidgetbum is the product for you.

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Our Diagnosis Journey

By Clare Meaney
on January 23, 2018

A sneak peak into our Diagnosis Journey.

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Guest Blog- The Benefits of employing an Autistic Person

By Clare Meaney
on July 30, 2016

Here is  Guest Blog from Joe from Incluzy.

In the UK there are more than 700,000 individuals living with autism, however, less than 15% of these people are in full-time employment. This is a dispiriting figure when you consider the many skills and talents people with autism have, skills which are highly beneficial in the workplace.

Autism Spectrum Disorder is not a disease or illness and it cannot be cured - the unique elements of autism are an integral part of the person’s make-up. As it is defined across a spectrum, people with autism will all experience it in a unique way, however, it usually has some effect on how individuals communicate and interact with others. As well, it is also important to remember that autism is not a visible disability.

In 2010, The Equality Act came into force in the UK and made it unlawful for any employer to discriminate on the grounds of disability. Perhaps this has made some employers reassess their approach to autism, however, employing people with a disability is not a matter of filling quotas. Instead, the focus should be on the value each individual can bring to the prospective role. Those who fall within the spectrum of autism have a huge amount to offer companies. Individuals with autism are often excellent problem solvers; have outstanding concentration and memory skills; pay great attention to detail; and are highly dependable, just some of the traits that companies are looking for in employees.

While every applicant who applies for a job should be treated as an individual, there is common ground amongst people with autism that can be reached, which, when recognised by companies can make the hiring process run much more smoothly.

Things to consider:

Communication

Some individuals with autism will find understanding body language and facial expressions difficult and this can sometimes hinder communication.

Repetitive Behaviours

People with autism will often see the world in a different way and thus they tend to enjoy the security of familiarity and routine. This is a positive trait in a working environment.

Interaction

Interaction concerns how individuals with autism behave in the presence of others. For example, if they are concerned, they may retreat within themselves; or they may sometimes appear insensitive, but only because they find it difficult to read cues from those around them.

The Interview Process

People with autism often develop a keen interest in a particular subject and become hugely knowledgeable about it. If you can discover what this interest is during the interview, and encourage the candidate to talk about it, it can help put them at ease. 

Sometimes jokes and sarcasm are not understood well by individuals with autism, as physical cues are hard for them to read. Therefore, be straightforward and express yourself clearly. Also, if there are gaps in the conversation don’t rush in to fill the silence, the person may just need a little longer to formulate their response.

The Induction Process

Once an individual with autism has been hired, there are simple steps you can take to make their first few days with you as positive an experience as possible.

  • Send induction material to the new employee early so they can take the time to read through and absorb it before they start. This will help to lessen first day nerves.
  • If possible, try to seat the person away from noise or people passing by regularly, as this can be unsettling. It’s also important to build structure into the day so individuals know what to expect.
  • People with autism can be perfectionists so it’s important to give regular feedback on how things are going and provide reassurance where necessary.

Individuals with autism tend to have strong skills in particular areas and can often outperform their peers in these capacities. It’s important therefore to tap into these strengths and allow the employee the freedom to utilise their skill-set within the working environment. When this happens much of the misunderstanding about autism falls away and employers recognise what a valuable asset the individual is to their business.

More information can can be found here.

 

A big thank you to Joe and the team at incluzy for there hard work and commitment to heping people with disabilies obtain jobs.

Frustration about Speech Delays and How to make Therapy Fun

By Clare Meaney
on May 04, 2016

I hear from a lot of parents who have children with Sensory issues that their children have speech delays. Communication is such a big thing for anyone living an independent life and reduces frustration being able to express what we think, what we want and what we need.
I always find babies babbling a crazy thing as my son never really did this he was pretty quiet apart from when he was crying he didn’t make the baby noises. He was always behind with speech and we decided to learn Makaton to help with the process.
Makaton is a language programme using signs and symbols to help people to communicate. It is designed to support spoken language and the signs and symbols are used with speech, in spoken word order.
Its lovely hearing about  Makaton Groups now in our local area Wirral, Hands Up with the lovely Steph, we were so lucky when my son was small that a group called Sundowns let us join in even though it is for children with Down’s Syndrome and we will always be grateful for the help they gave us at that time.
We have had a few group sessions of speech therapy over our time but funding for speech therapy as most know is a postcode lottery. Over the years his speech has got better and better but he is still very conscious about it and has had bullying in the past because of it. Kids can be cruel.
Since Home Educating I asked what would he really like to learn his answer……. ‘Learn how to speak properly so I don’t sound stupid’……. Heartbroken hearing those words I went on a momma mission (like those who know me happens quite a bit) I began researching we did the sounds test and worked out the 2 sounds we wanted to work on over this year.
Since October wow have we come on! We do blow football, we make fires that need lots of blowing to ignite them more(and of course has little boys interested) we do tongue exercises in the mirror, we use bendy straws lots, we use chews(a lot for sensory issues also) Confidence is building and we can fit it in far more than schools ever could.
Straws are a big thing in our house and the silly straws makes it all a bit fun. I think the key is to have fun with it. If my son thought he was doing speech therapy each day he probably wouldn’t do it as really it sounds boring and has been for him in the past but being silly with momma around the house with musical instruments singing lalalalala, babababa, thththth, mmmmm. So I think what I want you to realise from this blog is there is so much you can do at home whilst waiting for appointments, whilst making memories and having fun as a family.

Homeschooling and everyone thinking I’ve gone crazy (crazier)

By Clare Meaney
on January 09, 2016


One of my favourite quotes- you can’t knock a square peg into a round hole even if you force it.


Well its official we are now a homeschooling family and pretty excited about our journey. So a bit about us life was hard work every Sunday afternoon the meltdowns would start by Monday we had my little guy throwing up and completely beside himself with anxiety, at times he was so violent driving along and I could tell he didn’t want to behave like that but he just really couldn’t calm himself down. Holidays were always far easier but took a lot of organising. So I sat in a meeting being told he shows no obvious signs of anxiety so obviously living in the toilets, toe walking out of shoes in 3 weeks and biting through chews at a crazy rate were all ok.


I decided in this completely stressful moment there has got to be more to life than this for my special little boy and for myself and my family as it has a knock on effect for everyone as I sat there crying which everybody who knows me, I don’t cry often I decided to have a think about my options I am so lucky having an amazingly supportive family who supported my idea to Homeschool.


Some people’s reactions to me homeschooling have been funny, you can’t run a business, homeschool a child and be a single mum it’s not possible. Believe me I’m not saying it’s easy by far but it is possible the majority of stress has been lifted from our home and instead of using all my energy fighting with an education system that doesn’t help my child out I decided to use that energy to get organised and start living, learning and having some fun together.


I’m not saying everything is plane sailing now we homeschool. Christmas day I thought would be this magical, amazing time as he was so much calmer, boy was I wrong haha but you live and learn and pick yourself up again. Some days I don’t sleep until really late trying to stay organised and keep everything ticking over whilst trying to still remember to do the washing and not be off in the land of Pinterest/google and finding what fun stuff we can do now :-) But like I said we are lucky having amazing family helping out with piano, computer programming, spelling, trips out and holidays and everything in between.


We don’t have an issue with the education side of things at home as he is such a clever boy and being 1 to 1 he is flying though work at an amazing rate and wants to help now with cooking tea and is excited learning important life skills that schools aren’t teaching children in the current curriculum. We get to do his sensory diet integrated into lessons, spellings and reading with water beads, timetables whilst doing exercises and lots of work on motor skills and lots of speech and language exercises that I have researched for him. We can also use his Senseez cushion, calming music and fidget toys without a big deal being made about them.


Homeschooling really has been a blessing to us but it isn’t for everyone as it really does take a big commitment of time and it’s very full on but the reward for us is a boy who is starting to cope with life in a supportive environment. Our next challenge now we’ve taken time to get calmer is to join some homeschooling groups and evening activities as we have now got small meets with others going well and want to slowly expand his social interactions in a positive way and build on his growing confidence.


So as my favourite quote says it is so important to not knock off the corners of our lovely square pegs otherwise life would be so boring.

Month of events

By Clare Meaney
on December 02, 2015

Well it’s been a busy month how glad I am the big events are over. They are amazing but really hard work at the same time but we would like to thank The disabled Living team from Kidz to Adultz up North and The OT Show team and all at the NEC for all there help and guidance on these big events. We learn every time we do a big event like these what we are doing well and what we need to learn from (we’ve certainly learnt we need a proper trolley to carry all our items!)


The biggest thank you has to go to my parents my mum being teacher for my little man who is now homeschooled, and helping get me organised and my dad who did both the events with me on his days off from his other business (and lent us a member of staff), I really am so lucky to have this amazing support network around me a little brother who helps me set up and ropes in a friend to help us out too, It really is a family business.


It’s also great getting to meet other exhibitors we had a great guy Ben from Integrex next to us at the OT show who gave us some very valuable tips on where to park and even gave me sweets (much needed) and let me play on the amazing interactive games they sell.


So I think our most popular products have been the unusual magnatabs have been a sell-out everywhere for kids with confidence issues around writing for whatever reasons (motor skills, autism, dyspraxia or just bored of the usual hand writing sheets) these are perfect.


Our glitter lamps have also been a big success as they are the first type like that which don’t heat up at all so perfect for babies up to elderly and everyone in between.


We love meeting all the families and love finding out what kind of things they want us to look out for, if you have any suggestions we are more than happy to try and find them. We even have a few people interested in designing things we know people are looking for now so it’s a very exciting time.
Now to decide which shows to do next year……………..

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